Local Restoration

7-Eleven Canada has partnered with Restoration Packaging to plant a plant with each hot beverage cup sold. For every hot beverage cup purchased at any 7-Eleven Canada store, Restoration Packaging partners with a local restoration group within each province, to plant a plant at a local restoration site. All plants planted are local to that specific site and serve a direct purpose towards the reforestation and reclamation of habitat to that site.

By partnering with local restoration groups in each Province, The Buy this Cup. Plant a Plant program contributes towards the planting of millions of plants each year, creating a hyper-local planting program specific to each Canadian community.

One-For One Planting program

This one-for-one planting program is designed help offset the carbon footprint associated with each disposable hot beverage drink sold while giving back to local Canadian communities through local restoration initiatives.

New Standards

7-Eleven Canada setting a new standard for packaging and coffee consumption. 7-Eleven Canada’s program is empowering Canadian consumers to enjoy life more sustainably and simultaneously allowing 7-Eleven to reduce the organization’s carbon footprint.

The Cup's Journey

Customer buys 7-Eleven beverage

What is Restoration

res·to·ra·tion
/restəˈrāSH(ə)n/
noun

The process of ecological restoration of a site to a natural landscape and habitat, safe for humans, wildlife, and plant communities. Ecological destruction is usually the consequence of pollution, deforestation, salination or natural disasters.

What causes the Need for Restoration?

Deforestation is the permanent destruction of forests in order to make the land available for other uses. An estimated 18 million acres (7.3 million hectares) of forest are lost each year. In addition, natural disasters are occuring more frequently and more intensly, increasing the rate of landscape destruction.

Landfill Items

80% of landfill items are recyclable. This program is designed to not only create a more harmonious recycling process, but to also increase our resuables rate to reduce waste.

Carbon Footprint

The carbon footprints of 18 average Canadians can be neutralized by one acre of hardwood trees

Carbon Footprint

Each person generates approximately 2.3 tons of CO2 per year.

Fire Facts

Each year over the last 25 years, about 7,466 forest fires have occurred. The total area burned varies widely from year to year, but averages about 2.5 million hectares annually.

A Single Tree

A single tree can only absorb 48lb of CO2 per year. Trees are so effective in reducing Carbon Dioxide because they act as pollution filters by absorbing stomata in the surface of their leaves.

Plant Potential

We have the potential to plant 20 million plants per year throughout local Canadian restoration sites

A Single Cup

One paper coffee cup with sleeve (16 ounce) shows that the CO2 emissions is about 0.11 Kilograms (0.25 pounds) per cup. This includes the paper from the trees, material, production and shipping.

CO2 Absorption

An acre of trees absorbs enough CO2 over 1 year to equal the amount produced by driving a car 26,000 miles.

Recycled Paper

Each ton (2,000 pounds) of recycled paper can save 17 trees, 3 cubic yards of landfill space, 4000 kilowatts of energy, and 7000 gallons of water.

Second by Second

Every 2 seconds humans destroy an area of forest the size of a football field.

Greenhouse Gases

15% of all greenhouse gases are a result in deforestation.

4 out of 10

4 out of 10 trees are cut down and processed into pulp

Plastic Production

Since the 1950s, around 8.3 billion tons of plastic have been produced worldwide.

Trees Keep us Cool

Evaporation of water from trees has a significant cooling influence.

Restoration Regions Moving Forward

Maple Ridge

British Columbia

Why Malcolm Knapp?

Large plots of the forest were unsustainably harvested over the past decade. This planting helps
re-establish forest renewal.

250,000+

Plants to be Planted

Program Partners

Restoration Packaging partnered with The Loon Lake Research and Education Center,
University of British Columbia and Forest Recovery Canada to help with the reforestation
project.

Restoration

The Malcolm Knapp Research Forest (MKRF) was established in 1949. Since that time, it has been managed to provide an optimal environment for the research, education, and demonstration of sustainable forest management.

The MKRF is home to Loon Lake Research and Education Center, a world-class venue for wilderness education and recreation. Here, thousands of students from University of British Columbia learn about forest ecology, along with current forestry practices. Management of the MKRF emphasizes the responsible and sustainable use of our resources. Along with harvesting and reforestation, the MKRF is committed to the conservation of water, soil, biodiversity, community values, and First Nations interests.

WILDLIFE

A recently harvested cut-block will be the site for new research and education and long-term forest renewal. MLRP will work with local planting organizations while including UBC students to plant a mixture of native trees, some of which have been bred and custom-grown for relatively greater natural resistance to deer browse. This site has both ecological and wildlife significance, as the research and education objectives of the project involve finding a balance between forest regeneration and wildlife populations. Deer overpopulation has become a barrier to reforestation and ecological integrity in widespread areas, often as a result of wildlife introductions to new areas or predator population declines, which are linked to human impacts.

HABITAT

The Research Forest is located in the foothills of the Coast Mountains, approximately 60 km east of Vancouver, British Columbia. With a land base of 5,157 hectares, it spans several watersheds including the North Alouette River and a range of forest and ecosystem types representative of the lower coast region of British Columbia.
Hemlock
Red Cedar
White Pine
White Spruce

Cascadian Mountains

British Columbia

Why British Columbia?

The 2017 wildfire season in British Columbia, at the time, marked the most destructive wildfire season ever recorded in history for the Province. However, one year later in 2018, that record was surpassed by an even more destructive fire season.

10,000+

Plants to be Planted

Program Partners

Restoration Packaging partnered with One Tree Planted to help with the reforestation project.

Restoration

British Columbia is characterized by abundant forests, rugged Pacific coastline, mountains, plateaus, and pristine lakes and rivers. Forests cover two-thirds of the province – an area of almost 60 million hectares. However, visitors will have noticed a marked difference in B.C.’s trees in recent years. Insect pests and diseases have decimated enormous areas of forest.
These dead trees become fuel for wildfires, and in summer 2017 B.C. experienced its worst wildfire in history, with over 1.2 million hectares burned.
British Columbia has established itself as a leader in forest management, implementing stringent forest policies, stewardship programs and scientific research. Our reforestation partners are experts in rehabilitating B.C. forests and ensuring they have a sustainable future. Our reforestation practices will help us re fortify healthy forests that can reduce the damage from beetle infestations,
lessen the impact of wildfires, provide habitat for B.C.’s abundant wildlife, and preserve the province’s natural beauty for generations to come.

Wildlife

B.C.’s rich forest diversity includes more than 40 different species of native trees, with some of Canada’s most interesting and valuable tree species. Coniferous, or softwood, species such as pine, spruce, fir, hemlock and western red cedar are predominant in close to 90 per cent of B.C.’s forests.

HABITAT

British Columbia is Canada’s most ecologically diverse province. It has the country’s only temperate desert, near Osoyoos in the far south, and North America’s wettest weather station, on the west coast of Vancouver Island. It has temperate rainforests, dry pine forests, boreal forests, alpine tundra, grasslands and more. More than 1,100 species of birds, fish, mammals, amphibians and reptiles live in B.C., some found nowhere else in Canada. In summer 2017, British Columbia experienced the worst wildfire season in its history. It was unprecedented in the amount of land burned (over 1.2 million hectares), the total cost of fire suppression (over $568 million), and the number of people displaced (roughly 65,000 evacuated). The fire season prompted a Provincial State of Emergency that was declared on July 7 and not
rescinded until September 15, lasting 70 days. This was the longest Provincial State of Emergency in B.C’s history. Recovering from such significant wildfire damage will take careful forest management.

Western Cedar

Ponderosa Pine

Lodgepole Pine

Douglas Fir

Fort McMurray Fire.

Fort McMurray, Alberta

Why Fort McMurray?

Fort McMurray and surrounding communities of Wood Buffalo experienced the largest and most
destructive wildfire in Canadian history.

50,000+

Plants to be Planted

Program Partners

Restoration Packaging partnered with One Tree Planted to help with the reforestation project.

Fort McMurray Fire

The Fort McMurray fire burned May 1st through August 2nd in 2017 throughout Wood Buffalo, Canada. Part of the restoration goal was to create a fire barrier belt around the city to not only help restore and replant native species that were destroyed in the fire, but to also create a fire proof barrier around the city with these fire resistant species in order to protect the community from future fires.

Fire Facts

Canada has about 9% of the world’s forests. Each year over the last 25 years, about 7,466 forest fires have occurred. The total area burned varies widely from year to year, but averages about 2.5million hectares annually. Fire suppression costs over the last decade in Canada have ranged from about $500 million to $1 billion a year.

Fire Smart

Fire Smart is a program designed to remove flammable tree species and replacing them with less flammable species. This type of project helps create deciduous forests that are less likely to threaten homes and communities.

Wildlife

Hundreds of species call Alberta home– 587 to be exact. The big guys include moose,
grizzly and black bear. Grizzly bears are now limited to the area surrounding the Rocky
Mountains and forested areas in north-central and northwestern Alberta. Small mammals
include the pygmy shrew, beavers, red squirrels, and more. After wildfire activity, it is
important to re-establish plant fauna that helps support the base level of the wildlife
ecosystem. After the base level of plants, insects, birds and small mammals repopulate,
larger mammals will come back to call the forest home again.

HABITAT

The boreal region in Canada covers almost 60% of the country’s land area. The boreal region is
comprised of 8 sub-ecosystems which include bogs, mountainous landscapes and vast
forests.

Kalmia augustifolia
Larix larcina
Picea mariana
Picea glauca

Battle River Restoration

Ponoka, Alberta

Why Battle River Restoration?

Farmers along the Battle River in Ponoka struggle with sustainable farming practices. Mark and his
farm are setting a new standard in the Ponoka farming community when it comes to forest
renewal, grassland regeneration and habitat stabilization practices.

50,000+

Plants to be Planted

Program Partners

Restoration Packaging partnered with MSW Farms, Tree Time Services Inc and Coast 2 Coast
Reforestation to help with the restoration project.

Battle River Restoration

MSW Farms is a small family farm operating outside of Ponoka, Alberta using industry leading sustainable farming practices. Many surrounding farmers in the area, use toxic pesticides on crop that eventually drains down surrounding watersheds that then run through MSW Farm property. By planting trees to renew riparian corders and forests, Read MoreMSW Farm can filter out the toxic pesticides before the draining water leaches back into the Battle River, running through the property all the way through to Saskatchewan. The Battle River Watershed is a large area of land covering most of east-central Alberta. It drains into the Battle River. The Battle River itself is a modest, prairie-fed (as opposed to glacier-fed) river that lies within a valley that seems much too big for it.

WILDLIFE

Alberta Fish and Wildlife records show that over 250 wildlife species (fish, mammals, amphibians and birds) have inhabited the Battle River and Sounding Creek watersheds in recent years. Of these species, 2.7% are currently classified as “at risk,” 1.9% as “may be at risk,” and 21.8% as “sensitive” in Alberta, according to Alberta Sustainable Resource Development’s “General Status of Alberta Wild Species 2010” report. Read MoreFish and wildlife species may be indicative of the overall health of our watersheds; the interconnectedness of life tells us that the impacts we have on even one species may have much farther reaching impacts on the web of life as a whole. The biological integrity and diversity of our watersheds is essential to the health of our environment and our society. As well as providing major breeding habitat for waterfowl, the watershed also contains habitat for white-tailed deer, pronghorn, coyote, snowshoe hare, cottontail, red fox, northern pocket gopher, Franklin’s ground squirrel, and bird species like sharp-tailed grouse and black-billed magpie. The Battle River and Sounding Creek watersheds are also home to a number of species considered to be endangered or threatened, including Piping Plover, Peregrine Falcon, Ferruginous Hawk, and Burrowing Owl. Of special concern are Sprague’s Pipit, Loggerhead Shrike, Long-billed Curlew, White-winged Scoter, and Prairie Falcon. Species that have not been seen recently in the area include Bison, Wolf, and Whooping Crane.

HABITAT

Riparian areas are the land adjacent to a water body where the plants and soils are strongly influenced by water. Healthy riparian areas play a critical role in purifying our water through filtering and reducing surface water runoff from surrounding uplands and trapping sediment and associated pollutants such as nutrients, pesticides and bacteria.The vegetation slows the water in streams and rivers to reduce erosion, helps keep waters cool,and provides fish food and habitat. Riparian areas also contribute to water storage, which helps mediate the effects of both floods and drought.
Big Bluestem
Bottle Brush Grass
Fowl Bluegrass
Fowl Mangrass

Bunchberry Meadows

Spruce Grove, Alberta

Why Bunchberry Meadows?

Portions of Bunchberry Meadows were damaged due to urban expansion and sprawl. This
restoration project his to restore grasslands and meadows throughout parts of the nature preserve
for community members to enjoy.

5,000,000+

Plants to be Planted

Program Partners

Restoration Packaging partnered with The Land Conservancy Alberta, Edmonton Area Land
Trust, Tree Time Services Inc and Coast 2 Coast Reforestation to help with the reforestation
project.

Bunchberry Meadows

Bunchberry Meadows Conservation Area is located in the Devon Dunes Environmentally Significant Area. The area has a highly sensitive aquifer under sandy soils. The close proximity of the Bunchberry Meadows Conservation Area to the Clifford E. Lee Nature Sanctuary, North Saskatchewan River Valley, and the Devonian Botanical Gardens provides a significant habitat corridor and greater landscape connectivity in the region for wildlife. After the last iceage, meltwater created glacial Lake Edmonton, and much of the material was deposited in the east side of Parkland County. The deltaic sediments from Lake Edmonton were blown by post-glacial winds into unique sand dune formations.Read More These dunes, the Devon Dunes, are unique in that they represent a field of sand dunes formed from deltaic sediments – there is no other such landscape in the Edmonton region, and they have associated unique plant community features. Bunchberry Meadows is a full section of old growth forest near Edmonton. Over the past century, urban sprawl and growth damaged parts of the sensitive habitat spanning through the 640 acre park. The restoration work taking place throughout the meadows will help restore grasslands and meadows that cohesively meander throughout the old growth forests. An estimated 15 acres will be restored through these plantings.

WILDLIFE

It features aspen parkland woods, as well as pockets of white spruce, tamarack, jack pine, and wetlands, giving way to diverse plant communities throughout the whole area. This natural area is an important refuge for wildlife, and is home to many species including moose, deer, squirrels, owls, hawks, and songbirds.

HABITAT

There are a wide variety of habitats at Bunchberry Meadows, one of which is the open meadows habitat. Open meadows are characterized by tall grasses and a lack of trees. There are particular species of wildlife that prefer this habitat, including Clay-Coloured Sparrows, Garter Snakes, and Coyotes. Listen for the scream-like cry of Red-tailed Hawks flying overhead! Bunchberry Meadows is home to old-growth forest, and many of the trees within it are over 100 years old. Large, old trees are important reservoirs of carbon above and below ground, and also offer habitat for many plant and animal species. Read More The meadows main native plant (The Bunchberry) is a 4 to 6 leaved plant that grows low to the forest floor. It is identifiable by a white, four-petaled flower, but later in the summer, the plant produces a cluster of red berries. Bunchberries are edible, but tasteless, and are plentiful here on the forest floor. There are several wetlands on the Bunchberry Meadows Conservation Lands. Not only are wetlands extremely valuable wildlife habitat, but they also help to improve the local water supply by acting as a filter. Some of the species you may spot using this wetland include Canada Geese, Mallard ducks, Blue-winged Teals, Wood Frogs, and dragonflies or damselflies.

Arrow Leaf Aster

Big Bluestem

Canada Wild Rye

Foxglove

Agnew Renewal Project

Washago, Ontario

Why Agnew Nature Preserve?

The Agnew Renewal Project is a restoration project that will take place on a 30-hectare rural
property, an ideal site for a grasslands restoration project to benefit various bird species.

15,000,000+

Plants to be Planted

Program Partners

Restoration Packaging partnered with The Couchiching Conservancy and Forest Recovery
Canada to help with the reforestation project

Agnew Renewal Project

The Agnew Renewal Project is a restoration project that will take place on a 30-hectare rural property, an ideal site for a grasslands restoration project to benefit various bird species. The goal of the project is to create habitat for two particular grassland bird species that are listed as Threatened under Ontario’s Endangered Species Act, Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) and Eastern Meadowlark.Read More There are several probable factors responsible for driving population declines of Bobolink and Eastern Meadowlark in Ontario. Chief among them is a loss of breeding habitat, especially pasturelands and hayfields which have either been abandoned or have been converted to other industrial crop types.
The primary objective of the Agnew project is to establish suitable grassland habitat conditions, which has become overgrown with invasive and non-ideal species, reducing habitat quality for these birds, which have been identified on the property. The Agnew property is also under long-term protection through a conservation easement agreement registered by the Couchiching Conservancy. The Couchiching Conservancy, who will be restoring habitat on the Agnew property, is a non-profit, non-government land trust who has been operating since 1993 to protect over 12,000 acres of natural lands – in some cases globally rare ecosystems. The diverse region in which the Couchiching Conservancy operates encompasses the ecological transition from the Southern edge of the Canadian Shield to the farm country and forests of Oro-Medonte and the shallow limestone plains in the east.

WILDLIFE

The bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) is a small New World blackbird and the only member of the genus Dolichonyx. The numbers of these birds are declining due to loss of habitat. Bobolinks are a species at risk in Nova Scotia, and throughout Canada. In Vermont, a 75% decline was noted between 1966 and 2007.Read More Originally, they were found in tall grass prairie and other open areas with dense grass. Although hay fields are suitable nesting habitat, fields which are harvested early, or at multiple times, in a season may not allow sufficient time for young birds to fledge. Delaying hay harvests by just 1.5 weeks can improve bobolink survival by 20%. This species increased in numbers when horses were the primary mode of transportation, requiring larger supplies of hay. The eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna) is a medium-sized icterid bird, very similar in appearance to the western meadowlark. It occurs from eastern North America to South America, where it is also most widespread in the east. Eastern meadowlarks are species at risk in Nova Scotia and the subject of agricultural conservation program seeking to reduce mortality through modified practices. Allowing marginal areas of fields on farms to seed with grass can provide nesting habitat for meadowlarks and all grassland birds. Delaying hay harvest can also improve survival, giving young meadowlarks a chance of fledging.

HABITAT

To properly restore the habitat, a 9.4 acre portion of the property will be seeded with a mix of grass and legume seed. The site will undergo careful preparation in the spring so it is ready to be cultivated in the fall.Read More The remainder of the Agnew property consists of old fields, shrub and tree cover along with a cold-water stream, forming part of the headwaters of Hogg Creek. Much of the surrounding landscape is pastureland, with forested wetlands in stream valleys. The area has a number of deciduous forest species. These deciduous forests patches are habitat for birds, insects, reptiles, amphibians, and plants which rely on forest interior environment in order to survive. The negligible amount of forest interior habitat left in the south of our province accounts for many endangered, threatened, and rare species listings.

Arrow Leaf Aster

Big Bluestem

Black Eyed Susan

Canada Wild Rye

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